Completed Comprehensive Plan for Restoration of The First Church of Christ, Scientist

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Finegold Alexander is proud to announce it has completed the initial feasibility plan for the repair, restoration and maintenance of The Mother Church Original (TMCO) and The Mother Church Extension (TMCX) for The First Church of Christ, Scientist, on Massachusetts Avenue in Boston. The buildings are city icons located on a prominent 14.5-acre site that includes a grand plaza, the Mother Church and Extension, and a number of other buildings in the heart of the Back Bay neighborhood. It is the largest privately owned, yet publicly accessible space in Boston.

Finegold Alexander is leading the project and will oversee the multiple phases. They are working with building envelope specialists Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH), which is responsible for the building exterior, and Arup, which will provide electrical and fire protection services. Key elements include the preservation of the building envelope, interior repairs to address water infiltration, and life safety/accessibility code upgrades. Additional interior work will include plaster repairs, restoration of damaged interior stonework, electrical upgrades and interior painting to match original period colors.

The first phase is set to begin in April of this year, with a final completion date of March 2022.

“As specialists with a long history in historic preservation, we fully appreciate the privilege of working on this Landmark project,” said Regan Shields Ives, Principal, Finegold Alexander. “We look forward to restoring this architectural gem to its original splendor while bringing the building systems up to 21st century standards.”

“We are pleased to be restoring this architectural masterpiece and central place of worship to its original condition for our members, Boston’s citizens and visitors,” said Jack Train, Real Estate Assets Director, The First Church of Christ, Scientist.

The Original Mother Church was designed by Franklin Welch, completed in 1894.

Published in: BusinessWire